GramercyOne

GramercyOne Raises $14.5M From Revolution, Others For Cloud-based Business Management Software

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GramercyOne, a New York City-based provider of cloud-based business management and marketing software, has secured $14.5 million in Series A financing.

The funding round was led by Revolution Ventures (which is chaired by AOL founder Steve Case) with participation from Grotech Ventures, TDF and Jubilee Investments.

Launched in 2010, GramercyOne offers a product called Booker Platform, a swiss army knife of software tools that enable companies to attract and reach out to customers through social commerce, group buying services, mobile and local advertising and social booking solutions.

The company says it currently provides cloud services to over 2,500 companies across the globe (56 countries and counting, with eight languages supported so far).

Its customers range from small-sized service companies like local spas, fitness centers, beauty salons and whatnot to big organizations such as Hilton Worldwide.

GramercyOne claims its Booker Platform is currently used to process over 700,000 transactions – averaging $1 million in value – every day.

Says Revolution Ventures’ president, Tige Savage:

“GramercyOne allows the e-commerce revolution to move from the sale of products to
the sale of services.

The company’s leading applications finally make it as easy to purchase and schedule a service appointment online as it is to purchase a song or a book online.”

Savage will be joining GramercyOne’s board of directors together with Grotech’s Don Rainey; the two also serve on the board of LivingSocial.

Interestingly, GramercyOne was started after its SpaBooker platform was carved out as a business division within SpaFinder, a major spa media and marketing company.

According to the company, the functionality required to enable online scheduling of spa appointments was starting to gain traction outside of the spa industry, and thus the SpaBooker division was spun out in to what is now GramercyOne.