Microsoft Wants To Pick Your Brain For Windows Phone Tweaks

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Mango has already begun to trickle out into the wild, and Microsoft is still trying to figure out exactly what their Windows Phone users want. Case in point: they’ve just unveiled their new Suggestion Box, where users can submit and vote for ideas that they would like to see implemented in Windows Phone 7.

All snark aside, it’s a much better alternative to shooting your ideas out into the ether via Twitter, as the Windows Phone Blog is quick to point out. By centralizing all of their users suggestions, Microsoft can look at potential improvements and see where user priorities lay.

Despite only being open for the past few hours, a few ideas (like the three above) are already picking up steam among the Windows Phone fanbase. For the most part, the ideas tend to range from completely reasonable (a user named DevilSpawn wants less finicky capacitive keys), to the impossible (oggyb wants all existing Windows Phones to be able to wirelessly tether, even though some devices just don’t have the hardware for it).

Out of this first batch of ideas, my favorite comes from Timo, who wants to see deep GroupMe integration in Windows Phone to “enable free global texting” to anyone. While it’ll almost certainly never happen, it’s at least theoretically possible: Skype has recently acquired GroupMe, and Microsoft not-so-recently acquired Skype.

Also interesting is the fact that Microsoft’s use of UserVoice means people won’t be able to stuff the ballot boxes. Users are limited to a total of 10 votes, and you can only give a particular submission up to 3 of them. Once an idea is accepted for consideration, those votes go right back to your pile for use on another worthy submission.

With the site still in its infancy, none of the submissions have gained enough traction to warrant a further look from Team Windows Phone. Methinks Microsoft is trying to live up to their new tagline here, but let’s see if anything actually comes of it.