WikiLeaks iPhone App Made $5,840 Before Pulled By Apple, $1 From Each Sale Will Be Donated To WikiLeaks

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Igor Barinov, the developer behind the WikiLeaks app that got removed from the App store, has revealed the total breakdown of his app’s reach before it got taken down by Apple. Total damage? 4443 downloads and $5,840.14 in profit. The Moscow-based Barinov says that he’ll be donating $1.00 from each sale, a total of $4443 dollars, to WikiLeaks.

Barinov explained his motivations on our original post“I dont mind what wikileaks posts. But i like the way they are defending what i care about = my domain, my traffic, my 127.0.0.1. And if that way will lead to “alternative internet” – i dont want just to press Like button.”

Perhaps this semi-charity feature is what lead Apple to take down the app in the first place? Barinov holds that the company said over the phone that the app violated the following points of the iPhone Developer TOS. Apple confirmed the first point but not the second in a statement to the New York Times.

14.1 Any app that is defamatory, offensive, mean-spirited, or likely to place the targeted individual or group in harms way will be rejected

21.1 Apps that include the ability to make donations to recognized charitable organizations must be free

Because he’ll have to wait until January for Apple to transfer the money to his account, Barinov tells us he’ll most likely end up paying out of pocket initially. He also says will be sending the modest profits he did eek out to WikiLeaks via wire transfer (other options include sending a check but not PayPal, Mastercard or Visa) but is unclear on how to confirm that WikiLeaks actually received the money.

Barinov gave us no word on whether he plans on setting up shop in the Android market, which currently boasts multiple WikiLeaks apps.

Update: Barinov just sent me Apple’s official written response, the second TOS statute that the app is violating is …

22.1 Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location where they are made available to users. It is the developer’s obligation to understand and conform to all local laws

not 21.1 as reported above. Barinov also mentioned that he has already sent the money to WikiLeaks.

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