AppMakr: Make your own iPhone apps for just two bills

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What AppMakr lacks in vowels they make up for in coolness. AppMakr is a dead easy app design engine that allows you to enter a URL or search term, pick a few images, and publish an app to the App Store in a few minutes.

The service uses RSS feeds and searches to build a comprehensive feed of your website or “personal brand” that is updated automatically. You can then push the app live for $199 or download the app to your own machine for $499.

The pricing is a little weird. Here’s the official skinny:

$199 – The Easy Way: AppMakr Publishes Your App
Submit your app in minutes, with AppMakr as the publisher. Skip the difficult parts of making an iPhone app, like having to work with Xcode and figuring out the app certification and provisional process. You can even insert your own ads in the app. Apps built with this option will have a small AppMakr logo on the app splash screen.

$499 – You’re In Control: Publish Under Your Own Brand
Take control of the app building process by creating an Apple Developer Account and loading your certificates into AppMakr. We’ll take care of the rest, including the provisioning, building and management of your apps. You’ll also be able to test apps on your own phone with Ad Hoc builds.

You can also hire the company to help you for $120 an hour, although that’s not really necessary.

The process is simple. You first enter your URL or search terms. The system searches for feeds and media and then places it into a browser. You can also grab logos from your disk or a URL. The simulator demos your app as you build it.

You then ad various feeds including YouTube, Digg, and TweetMeme data. The main feed shows on the front page while subsidiary feeds appear when you tap buttons at the bottom.

The current templates do not allow for “static” pages – About pages, for example – but that is coming.

The company just launched last night and we saw it live at a CES event. It seems like a great way for personal micro-brand-aware individuals to monetize their current feed value through the use of highly targeted data chunklets in a mobile context. Ha! Just kidding. But if you have a blog, it’s worth looking into.

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