TwitterCounter Wants To Count Dollars, Too

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TwitterCounter, a fairly basic but popular service that gives users insights on how well they’re doing on Twitter with regards to numbers of followers and tweets, is flicking the revenue switch to ‘ON’.

A decent amount of Twitter users regularly visit the TwitterCounter website to get statistics based on their account name – Compete pegs the number of monthly uniques at approx. 650,000 – and the team behind the service believes companies and organizations could well be willing to pay them a monthly fee for a premium service with more features and more detailed stats.

In what the company dubbed the Premium Dashboard, paying customers are able to compare and track multiple accounts and obtain stats from over a year’s time rather than the maximum of 3 months non-paying visitors get to see. In addition, TwitterCounter ‘pro’ users gain the ability to export statistics in CSV format and enjoy their graphs in a larger format.

Patrick De Laive from TwitterCounter tells us support for multiple account tracking and comparisons was an oft-requested feature and that the team, which is also behind a ‘MyBlogLog for Twitter’ service called TwitterRemote and events like The Next Web Conference in Amsterdam, is happy to finally be able to offer it. Not that the self-funded startup wasn’t already trying to monetize the web service: they also offer a way for users to gain more followers by ‘featuring’ them at a per-view rate (e.g. 100,000 views for $289).

Pricing for the Premium Dashboard is based on the number of users you would like to track, starting at $25 per month for 5 users and up to $198 per month for 100 users. Call me crazy, but while pricing may sound steep I can actually see why companies – and particularly their PR and marketing departments – would be willing to cough that up for this type of service.

Let Twitter work out how and if it will make money on their own in the meantime.

(In the interest of full disclosure, I should point out I used to write for The Next Web blog)

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