IT grad can't find job, sues her college

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Who hasn’t thought about suing their college for some reason or another? Trina Thompson is doing it. She’s a 27-year-old IT graduate from the Bronx who’s suing her alma mater, The Monroe College, for the $70,000 worth of tuition she spent there. Why? Because she doesn’t have a job and she doesn’t think the college has tried hard enough to help her find one.

Thompson’s loans are apparently coming due and she and her mother, who’s a substitute teacher, won’t have enough money to live. Mom Carol says, “We’re going to be homeless, and we’ll still have a student loan to pay.”

In response to the suit, school spokesperson Gary Axelbank says, “The lawsuit is completely without merit. The college prides itself on the excellent career-development support that we provide to each of our students, and this case does not deserve further consideration.”

Yeouch.

Here’s a tip for anyone who’s about to graduate college: Your college will make you believe that you’ve got the world by the balls. Then once you start working, you’ll realize that the real world has YOU by the balls. Pay your dues for 3-5 years and you’ll eventually make enough money to break even every month, at which point you can start trying to pay off all those credit cards and student loans.

Just when you start to actually make some decent money, have three kids. Repeat the repayment cycle once they’re all off to college. Then retire and move someplace warm. And if you graduate during a down economy (as I did right before September 11th) you’re not going to get a job in your requisite field, even if your college has the best job placement services in all the land. You’ll have to temp at Verizon’s kiosk in the Tacoma Mall during the holidays while all the kids who are still in college drop by and ask you what you’re doing working there.

That, or try to sue your college.

Jobless grad sues college for 70G tuition [New York Post via CIO.com]

image via Flickr

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