Kampyle

Kampyle Helps You Understand Why Nobody Is Installing Your Software

Next Story

Oyster card hack published, released at security conference


Instead of dwelling on whether an economic apocalypse is about to loom upon us, some startups are plugging away at improving their products. Israeli Kampyle is a case-in-point. Today the company is extending its feedback analytics platform from websites to client software—with a specific focus on the installation process, a major pain point for client applications.

Most software client application installations have high abandonment rates. There’s no shortage of reasons for users to abort the installation process, these include: slow/heavy downloads, too many steps, security concerns, lack of information, and too many ads. Speaking to customers, Kampyle learned that the aborts leave companies with many assumptions, but few conclusions. Sure, many companies trigger uninstall feedback forms when the user abruptly ends the installation, but it seems—at least from what Kampyle has learned—companies find it difficult to translate the collected information to actionable items.

Kampyle for Software is designed to do just that. It leverages Kampyle’s feedback analytics platform to aggregate and manage feedbacks generated by two forms it produces—one for the Installation, the other for uninstall. Instead of manually going through each feedback form, as many companies do today, Kampyle groups the feedback alltogether and presents the aggregate information in easy-to-read charts.  The forms are completely customizable of course, and so are the landing pages that are designated to open upon installation termination. No special programming knowledge is required to integrate the calls into installer creation tools such as InstallShield.

Kampyle for Software is free for Open Source applications. Commercial applications will be priced by scale, with a minimum of $99/mo. The first month is free so there’s no reason not to give it a shot.

From its debut 5 months ago, Kampyle has amassed 3000 customers. It may not be the next Google, but at least it’s plugging away.

blog comments powered by Disqus