Get the last laugh by insisting that your family send your ashes to the moon for $10,000

Next Story

CrunchArcade: Cigarette-like warning label could soon be on UK video games

ashes

Funerals are expensive. To my family and friends; I’d rather my funeral have an open bar, a band, and a gigantic velvet painting of me than an open casket and a bunch of people crying. I’d also consider the possibility of you sending my ashes to the moon in a bullet-like canister (see above photo).

Granted it wouldn’t be all my ashes, just a small quantity of my ashes. Maybe like my hand or something. Then freeze my head and send the rest of my body to the organ donor place and conveniently disappear when they try to give you my corpse back after they harvest my organs. Then they can worry about disposing of everything.

Should you choose to go with the moon-ash thing, please use this service by Celestis, Inc. unless another, cheaper alternative has arisen by the time I die.

Here’s what will happen…

The process is simple and completed with the utmost respect and care. A portion of cremated remains is carefully placed inside a permanently sealed, individual flight container, loaded into the Space Services spacecraft and attached to the launch vehicle.

On launch day families gather at the liftoff site to share the experience of seeing their loved ones’ dreams of spaceflight realized. With a roar and a fiery streak across the sky, the rocket lifts its precious load higher and higher into the peaceful solitude of space.

Memories of the flight participants’ lives are shared among friends and family at the pre-launch memorial service and preserved on the keepsake video or DVD (included in the service), and biographical section of our Web site.

Post Launch. After a successful launch, Space Services provides a professionally produced videotape or DVD of the entire event to the participant’s family or designee.”

Please rip and encode the DVD into FLV format and send it to tips at crunchgear.com, labeled “Doug Aamoth’s Final Review” but don’t send it to TechCrunch because most of the comments would be something like, “And this is on TechCrunch WHY?!!” or “I’m important! Give me my five minutes back!” or “Worst thing I’ve ever seen! You should die!” and this is supposed to be a happy time, plus I’d already be dead.

The pricing starts at just under $10,000 but I plan on living for at least 100 more years, so I’d think that it’d be cheaper by then.

capsules_combo

via Reuters

blog comments powered by Disqus