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Apple iTunes 7 Music Purchases Not Working on SLVR and ROKR Phones?

This week has been pretty heady with some great shots of the Zune and news of HD support for the XBox 360. We also got a video review of the Samsung Trace, which we’ll be giving away in our Name that Squid contest.

Yamaha YSP-1100
iSoundCap – Put Your iPod Nano In Your Hat
Key Finder Thing
Banksy’s Paris Jam
Engine on a Chip

  • http://superfeedr.com Julien GENESTOUX

    Great write-up. In the end, I think what matters most is not what “technology” is being used by who, but really that everybody sorts of agree that RSS/Atom are too “static” and they both need velocity.

    • http://wyman.us/ Bob Wyman

      There is nothing inherently “too static” about Atom. In fact, the issues of PubSub distribution (like what is done via PSHB and XMPP PubSub) were explicitly considered at great length during the definition of the Atom format. For instance, Atom includes a number of features that make this sort of application much easier:
      * Atom defines both “feed” and “entry” as top-level objects. This was done to permit the distribution of single entries and to permit entry aggregation as well as the construction of streams entries from multiple sources without loss of information.
      * Atom provides a robust “source” element to permit entries to explicitly describe their source feeds. Thus, an entry on its own is semantically equivalent to an entry in a feed.
      * Atom explicitly prohibits considering the order of entries in a feed to have semantic meaning. Thus, an entry with a source element can be properly evaluated, in isolation, outside a feed.
      * Atom provides mechanisms to digitally “sign” both entries and feeds. This allows you to state and determine the author of a feed or entry without polling the source site.
      * etc.. (many other minor details are included)

      RSS, on the other hand, is much more problematic when used in real-time applications largely because it became “mature” in an environment where only polling was considered useful. When we were developing Atom, those of us at PubSub.com and others were working hard to make the real-time web a reality and thus could see the things that Atom needed but that RSS had failed to anticipate.

      bob wyman

      • Matthew Terenzio

        Those are all great things, most if not all of which can be accomplished by a namespaced extension.

        I do appreciate all the effort and genius that went to baking them in to the original spec though. Don’t take me wrong here.

  • http://newgadgets.dailytidbit.com/new-gadgets/hey-you-get-off-of-my-cloud/ New Gadgets | Hey You Get Off of My Cloud

    […] Original post by Hostpundit – Hosting and Gadgets […]

  • http://siliconangle.com/ver2/sabackchan/2009/07/24/cloudiness-for-the-day-so-far-can-the-u/ Cloudiness for the day so far: Can the U… « /SAbackchan
  • Matthew Terenzio

    There are a few subtle differences. Pubsubbhubbub actually delivers the feed payload, while rssCloud just notfies the subscriber that a change has occured. Actually, maybe that’s not so subtle.

    • http://wyman.us/ Bob Wyman

      It’s not a “subtle” difference. Pushing payload, rather than just update notifications, drastically improves the scalability of these systems.

      A system that only delivers notification is little more than a “thin” ping generator and almost inevitably suffers from the “thundering herd” problem. (i.e. As soon as notifications are distributed, the publishing site gets crushed by polling requests for the updated feeds. This is basically the same as the “Slashdot effect” and makes service management very difficult.) Note: Because the feeds contain more than one entry, serving feed requests usually consumes vastly more bandwidth than simply distributing updated entries.

      A system that pushes the updated content as messages payload is able to drastically reduce the burstiness of its polling traffic and can much better manage its request load. This is true since most systems will trust that the payload is correct and will not poll-back to verify the contents. (This was part of the premise behind the old “fat-ping” proposals like FeedMesh that we pursued years ago.) Note: If “fake” updates become a problem, the Atom format provides for digital signatures that will allow the receivers of messages to validate received content without needing to poll the source feed.

      bob wyman

      • Matthew Terenzio

        Yup, it’s more complex and more efficient.

        I was being a little too subtle in my humor in the original comment. It’s a huge difference.

        And in the pubsubhubbub method, the hub is definitely right in between the publisher and the subscriber.

        Good place to collect data and place semantic and behavioral based ads. ; )

  • http://james.wheare.org James Wheare

    Why must Twitter learn to surface tweets more effectively. They seem to have done a good job satisfying massive user demand by just focusing on making the interpersonal thing happen. I’d hate to see that side take a back seat in favour of assigning a global weighting.

    Put control into the hands of users, let me decide who I care about the most, not your algorithms.

  • http://blog.broadbandmechanics.com/2009/07/26/blogging-from-boca-raton-florida/ Marc's Voice » Blogging from Boca Raton, Florida

    […] And thanks to Steve Gillmor for sorting out the so-called conspiracies and BigCo versus small guy is… […]

  • http://garyburge.com/ Gary Burge

    Thanks, Steve. I like this division of labor: You handle the personalities, spit ball fights and politics. I’ll just implement the products.

  • http://www.brianalvey.com/ Brian Alvey

    “It’s only partially random that Twitter emerged out of the ashes of a podcasting service.”

    Poetic insight.

  • http://www.geo-sms.blogspot.com laalay ki jaan

    There are a few subtle differences.

  • http://blog.feedly.com Edwin Khodabakchian

    This is a good right up. I am wondering why there is only 13 comments. You might be a little ahead of your time.

  • http://thepaisano.com paisano

    Hmm. Interesting title… I did this for Sarah Lacy a year ago

    http://www.sarahlacy.com/sarahlacy/2008/07/hey-you-get-off.html

    I know… just a coincidence…

  • http://twitter.com/sull sull

    I think a better post about this stuff can be found here:

    http://dashes.com/anil/2009/07/the-pushbutton-web-realtime-becomes-real.html

    It’s about “Push Button” without the author actually pushing buttons ;)

    @sull

  • http://secondthoughts.typepad.com Prokofy Neva

    Good job of reporting these issues.

    I agree with James that the beauty of Twitter is that it is not yet spoiled by weight and Google like algorithms, but the user decides whom to follow and makes his own weights.

    If Twitter or anyone else thinks they are doing the user a favour by boosting for the users’ view the twitter accounts that have the most followers or the most RTs or whatever the algorithm is, they are wrong. It serves only the ad agency Google and others that want to profit. I think we’re at the point now at all these free services is that we want to see companies monetarize and sustain them, but not by imposing their ideologies on the content, and that means whatever is first in view.

    Internet search as it is now is dominated by the “bigco” Google, biggest of them all, and its friends, like Wikipedia, a “bigorg” that dominates first place in every search not because it’s necessarily good, or non-biased, or helpful, but because loads of people link to it because…loads of other people link to it because…it is always pushed and shoved up first by search algorithms.

    That there are supposed to be correctives in Google that means that “actually doesn’t happen” doesn’t persuade me, simply because now I have Twitter to see how it works without the Silicon Valley finger on the weight scale. (Of course some services have twiterati to see, and Ev and Biz try to sway it with their favoured accounts but most users ignore it).

    I’m still trying to figure out why I need RSS, given that I have twitter, except, of course, it’s useful for reading accounts like @davewiner that have follow-blocked me. I can search for their name and then RSS feed the Twitter search to my Google reader.

  • http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/09/09/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win/ RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://www.submitteronline.com/blog/2009/09/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win.html RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win | Submitter

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://www.upoff.com/2009/09/10/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win/ RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win | UpOff.com

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://www.emediaone.net/index.php/2009/09/09/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win/ RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win | eMediaOne

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://www.dreamnest.in/technology/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win.html RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win | Technology

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://busybb.us/2009/09/rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win-2/ BusyBB.us » RSSCloud Vs. PubSubHubbub: Why The Fat Pings Win

    […] note: With all of the debate lately between RSSCloud versus PubSubHubbub, we wanted to hear from a developer who could actually […]

  • http://jp.techcrunch.com/archives/20090909rsscloud-vs-pubsubhubbub-why-the-fat-pings-win/ RSSCloudとPubSubHubbub, どっちがいい?: fat pingが勝つのはどうして?

    […] 編集者注記: 最近は、RSSCloudかPubSubHubbubかという議論が騒々しくなっているので、どちらにも詳しいデベロッパから話を聞きたくなった。この記事を書いたJosh Fraserは、EventVueの協同ファウンダで、空き時間にはPubSubHubbubに積極的に貢献している。彼はとくに、WordPressのプラグインをはじめ、PubSubHubbubのクライアントライブラリをいくつか作った。彼は、どっちに軍配を上げるだろうか。 […]

  • http://link Ganry35

    Please don’t think we’re all rich? ,

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